Categories
Fashion 101 technical design

Fit Consistency Matters

Ever wonder why you wear a size 6 in denim brand and a size 4 in others? A size small in some shirts and a medium in others? 

It’s all the donuts you’re eating while maintaining your yo-yo dieting techniques.

OMG KIDDING. Had to though.

It’s quite simple. Different brands use different human bodies to fit their base-size product. So, even if two different brands are using their base size medium model, those 2 bodies could vary. Giving you one brand offering a size M that fits differently than another brand’s M.

So, what about when the same brand is offering 2 of the same styles, and those same styles in size M seem to fit you differently? Well, there are a few factors that could contribute to that:

  • If they are a larger company, it’s possible that they use different fit models across their different category of product. For instance, they may have one model for their knit category, and another for their wovens.
  • It could simply be a manufacturing mistake. Manufacturers are people too- they’re not robots. When they are building garments, they have a certain tolerance range they are allowed to hit from their target measurements. So, if they are delivering the final product 1″ smaller in circumference in the waist of a pant, while it might be allowed by the buyer and approved to ship, it will be apparent to a return customer if the fit is different than their previously purchased pair.
  • Another reason could just be the inconsistency of the brand in their fitting habits. If they are using a new fit model every time they fit, their fitting is going to be inconsistent. In that same lane, brands should be fitting on models whose body types represent their target customer. For example, if you are gearing your brand to a middle-aged woman, you shouldn’t be fitting on an 18-year-old.

Inconsistent fit can really hurt your brand. If it’s all over the place, or never seems to stay the same, you will lose the trust of your customer. You should be able to re-purchase your favorite tee from your favorite brand and not worry that it won’t fit. No one likes to make online returns.

Stay cool. Stay consistent.

Categories
Fashion 101

Let’s Talk Logos

Brand identity is key to success in the fashion business. This much has always been true, and will continue to be. The way the message is relayed, however, has been #updated.

You guys – whether you like it or not, (whether you’re in your 60’s, 40’s, or 20’s and just old-school), social media is THE key to success right now. Your brand “icon”, “logo”, or “wordmark” is paramount to the degree of the success you will or will not have.

The way you brand or identify yourself is basically your business card. Let’s unpack this really quick.

Back in the day, business cards were the golden ticket. You could sidle up to someone you’ve been dying to meet, savvy up some random conversation and slip them your card. If it was a good one (an interesting one), you may or may not have received a call or email.

Today, your business card is your social platform. The content you create is your newsletter, and your brand icon or logo is your “about” page.

So I’d like to talk about The Casual Brand Creative, and the reasoning behind our icon, in hopes that it may inspire you to take a second glance at your own.

Color is the first element that draws an audience. Color speaks many languages, and above all, the language of emotion.

Casual Brand Creative landed on a neutral tone for color as an icon backing. This is because we design neutrally. We pride ourselves on absorbing all of our clients’ needs and desires to create products that speak for the brand, not to our personal preferences.

We constantly hear advice that you should only offer service to brands that fit your subjective design perspective, and we aren’t down with that.

At CBC, we pride ourselves on looking beyond our subjective thoughts and opinions on design in order to create a product that is on brand with whomever we work with.

This is not to say that we work with every random Joe in the business. But if Joe has something interesting to say, we’re going to do our damndest to say it the best way for Joe.

xoxo,

CBC

Categories
A Kick in the Ass Fashion 101

Things To Consider When Starting Your Brand

I want you to have your fashion brand dreams realized.

I do.

I want you to have all of the creative fun putting together what your first line or product will look like. To feel the fabrics, create patterns and colors that you’ve dreamed about. To see the designs that have been sitting in the back of your mind realized, down on paper, rendered.

I want you to feel the accomplishment that comes with learning about the process and work that goes into building a physical garment.

I want you to build a brand that will one day be profitable, and sustainable.

I want you to have a really great time at your first photo shoot with YOUR product being shot!

I want to sip that champagne with you when you receive your first orders, be it online or through a wholesale account.

I want all of these things for you.

But in order to do any of these things, there are a lot of things to seriously consider before you decide to jump in and commit. And commitment is the baseline.

A few key considerations to reflect on before committing to starting your apparel line

Money

I feel like this should be a no-brainer, but you would be surprised at how many people I speak with come to me wanting to build a product and brand without any real financial commitment to the project.

This is not to say you need to be a millionaire to start something. Different projects will require different financial commitments. If you are starting off with 1 sock design, you will not need as much money prepared as for, say, someone looking to build a 10-piece collection. Which brings me to…

Product Range

How many items are you looking to start out with at the outset? You should have a solid idea of what it is exactly that you want to do.

One thing to note, is that you do not need to have a huge collection to start off. In fact, I work with a lot of individuals looking to launch 1-2 products in the beginning. And that is totally fine. I will say, however, that those 1-2 products should be the best in their category if that is the product that you will announce to the world as your brand.

Time

Cliche but true: Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither will your line be.

If you are sampling and producing in the US, you can expect sampling to take around 1 month for 1 sample (and usually you will need at least 2-3 rounds of sampling, depending on the complexity of the garment). Production will usually take around 10-12 weeks.

If you are sampling and producing in the overseas, you can expect sampling to take around 2-3 weeks for 1 sample (and usually you will need at least 2-3 rounds of sampling, depending on the complexity of the garment). Production will usually take around 3 months.

Production Minimums

You will be har-pressed to find a quality manufacturer to make 50 units of one style for you.

Prepare for at least a 100-300 style minimum order requirement. And that usually covers 1 color.

So, of your minimum order requirement for 1 style is 100 units, and you want to offer 2 colorways, prepare to order 200 units for that particular style.

Calendar

As a brand, you need to consider the calendar when beginning design. If you want to be in the wholesale business to sell to retailers, you will be on a less flexible calendar than someone who is doing a direct-to-consumer (D2C) business. Buyers buy at certain times throughout the year to fulfill their seasonal inventory needs, so if you want to sell to them, your collection needs to be ready to show at specific dates.

If you’ve considered all of these points and are confident that it’s time to move to the next step, I encourage you to reach out to us at create@thecasualbrandcreative.com.

And even if you’re not confident…we’re here for that to!